United Way of Southern Kentucky Announces Over $650,000 in Investments In Warren County | SKYCTC

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United Way of Southern Kentucky Announces Over $650,000 in Investments In Warren County

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THE SKYCTC FOUNDATION WAS AWARDED $11,500 FOR THE COLLEGE’S CDL AND THE GED FINISH LINE PROGRAMS AS PART OF THE UNITED WAY OF SOUTHERN KENTUCKY INVESTMENT IN EDUCATION, HEALTH, INCOME, AND SAFETY NET PROGRAMS IN WARREN COUNTY

(June 23, 2021) – United Way of Southern Kentucky announced today that it is investing a total of $650,504 in Education, Health, Income and Safety Net programs and services for its July 1, 2021, to June 30, 2022 funding period in Warren County. In total, $1,013,758 will be invested across the 10-county Barren River Area Development District (BRADD).

To receive funding from United Way of Southern Kentucky (UWSK), programs had to align with the four areas deemed most important by a community research project conducted by United Way that began in 2012 and included nearly 5,000 surveys, 55 Community Conversations, and large amounts of secondary data. The four broad areas of most concern were defined by the community as: Education, Income, Health, and Safety Net. Programs were also evaluated on the following IMPACT criteria: Innovative, Measured, Partnered/Collaborative, Accountable, Community-centered, and Transformative. This includes an emphasis on programs that provide services within a best practices framework, that are collaborative and integrated into the fabric of other community education, income, health and safety net efforts, that consider the goals, needs and aspirations of the communities they serve, and that are innovative.

In October of 2021, organizations with programs impacting UWSK’s strategic imperatives in each of the defined Community Impact issue areas (Education, Income, Health, and Safety Net) were asked to submit a Letter of Intent indicating their desire to complete a full application request for funding. Across the 10-county BRADD, 66 total Letters of Intent were submitted and 11 nonprofit agencies submitted applications for the first time.

In March 2021, Warren County specific programs who had the opportunity to complete the full application moved forward to a full application review and virtual visit with the Allocations Committee. With the full review by the Allocations Committee and recommendation to and approval by the UWSK Board of Directors complete, funding will now be awarded to the programs selected. In Warren County, 28 local programs provided through 19 service providers will receive the allocated campaign dollars and donor designations.

2021/22 marks the sixth funding cycle for the new community impact plan in these areas. The Community Impact plan was originally developed to create long-term community change and serve as a road map for United Way and its partners on how to build a better community that provides opportunity for all. At its core, Community Impact harnesses the power of the entire community to create significant, sustainable improvements, and thus it requires many community partners working together to solve complex, systematic problems.

Allocation dollars were determined based on the work of 97 volunteers working specifically in their home counties of Allen, Barren, Butler, Edmonson, Hart, Logan, Metcalfe, Monroe, Simpson, and Warren. In total, these volunteers invested approximately 970 hours in the process which began with training sessions for all volunteers. This time generated an impact of $26,384 in service to our community (based on National Rate of Volunteer Time: $27.20 per hour). Volunteers reviewed programs, finances, governance, and outcomes to develop the recommendations for program investments.

In WARREN COUNTY, $650,504 will be allocated by volunteers, led by Warren County Allocations Committee Chair Tad Pardue.

EDUCATION: $338,910

Kindergarten Readiness: Led by Committee Chairs, Kenly Ames and Joe Tinius

Family Enrichment Center, Little Bobcat Learners Program: $28,714

Family Enrichment, Wee Care Child Care Center: $61,714

The Foundry Christian Community Center, Preschool Academy: $60,000

Warren County Public Schools, Little Learners Mobile Classroom: $40,000

WKU, Renshaw Early Childhood Center: $10,864

College/Career Readiness: Led by Committee Chairs, Dr. James McCaslin & Lee Alcott

Boys & Girls Club of Bowling Green, The CLUB Teen Center – CAREERLAUNCH: $24,969

Junior Achievement of Southcentral Kentucky, Essential Skills Initiative – Preparing At-Risk Youth for Success: $8,471

Warren County Schools, College/Career Transition Readiness – Connect Students to Success: $38,500

WROTE Foundation, Bridging the Gap After-School/Summer Enrichment Program: $65,678

INCOME: $27,000

Workforce Development: Led by Committee Chairs, Scott Taylor and Jon Thomason

Refuge Bowling Green, Hand Up, Hand Back: $10,000

SKYCTC Foundation, CDL Program: $7,500

SKYCTC Foundation, GED Finish Line Program: $4,000

Lifeworks E-Learning Lab, Electronic Access to Employment Training Services for Young Adults with Autism: $5,500

HEALTH: $149,627

Access to Affordable Health Care: Led by Committee Chairs, Brenda Polley and Thomas Manco

Barren River Area Safe Space, Safety First: $3,890

HOTEL INC, Street Medicine: $20,300

Kentucky Legal Aid, Barren River Long Term Care Ombudsman: $27,223

Kentucky Legal Aid, Benefits Counseling: $28,224

New Beginnings Therapeutic Riding, Inc: $7,731

Safe Home & Community: Led by Committee Chairs, Tom Flynn and Angela Dossey

BRASS, Emergency Shelter & Crisis to Protect & Empower (ESCAPE): $25,890

CASA of South Central Kentucky, Court Appointed Special Advocates: $6,221

Kentucky Legal Aid, Emergency Shelter & Crisis Aid to Protect & Empower (ESCAPE): $30,148

SAFETY NET: $134,967

Access to Basic Needs: Led by Committee Chairs, Karen Foley and Bill Waltrip

HOTEL INC, Homeless and Housing Services: $45,000

Kentucky Legal Aid, Emergency Legal Assistance: $42,795

Megan’s Mobile Grocery: $13,793

Transportation: Led by Committee Chairs, Scott Taylor and Jon Thomason

BRASS, Shelter Transportation Assistance Program: $6,890

Down Syndrome of South Central Kentucky, We Transport!: $2,715

International Center of Kentucky, Transportation Service to Refugees and Immigrants: $12,574

Refuge Bowling Green, Driver’s Education Program: $11,200

Still to be invested in Warren County: $20,800

“Although our sixth year of work in Education, Income, Health and Safety Net was an unprecedented one, due to the dedication of our organizational partners and the commitment of our volunteers, these investments were made possible, said Debbie Hills, President & CEO of United Way of Southern Kentucky. “The change being made, especially in times like these, continues to effect the community positively. The challenges that families in our community are facing make the work even more crucial to the community’s success. We are grateful for the incredible nonprofit agencies that have partnered with us and are excited to see new agencies partnering with us each year. We look forward to continuing this progress through our collective efforts both now and in the future.”

For more information on how you can make the choice to LIVE UNITED through giving, advocating and volunteering, log on to the United Way of Southern Kentucky website at www.liveunitedtoday.com.

United Way of Southern Kentucky (UWSK) is a local, independent, non-profit organization that works to identify and address the issues that matter most, change conditions and improve lives. The mission of United Way of Southern Kentucky is to be the leader in bringing together the resources to build a stronger, more caring community. United Way is focused on the building blocks for good quality of life – Education, Income, Health and Safety Net. Therefore, the vision of United Way is a Southern Kentucky where all residents are educated, healthy, and financially stable. Incorporated as a charitable non-profit entity in 1956, UWSK has long served a major role in the community by bringing people together to create opportunities that make a measurable difference in the quality of life for people where they live and work.